Mobility problems should not be underestimated

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I FELT I had to respond to Ms Adams’ letter about disabled parking at the Conquest.

Prior to becoming friends with two families who have disabled children I did not understand what it is like for someone to have mobility problems. It has been a huge eye opener.

It is unfortunate that there are people who are not interested in understanding what life can be like for others.

Perhaps Ms Adams would like to consider how difficult it is for parents of disabled children to even get them out of the car with the car in a ‘normal’ parking space?

It is impossible to get an older child out of their car seat without being able to open the door very wide. Their legs may not bend and they are unable to help you get them in or out by moving their legs, they need you to manoeuvre them into position.

What about an adult trying to get from a car to a wheelchair? It isn’t just about being close to the door of the hospital, it’s also about being able to get out of your vehicle in the first place.

If you have mobility problems getting from A to B is hard enough so having to go a further distance to get into the hospital can make things even more difficult for people.

It is extremely disappointing for Ms Adams to suggest that disabled people who wish to use a disabled parking space are ‘moaners’.

Several people I know with disabled children have extremely difficult day-to-day lives but they rarely moan and have a ‘can do’ attitude often in the face of huge challenges.

I presume that the ‘free’ car referred to is Motability. In fact this is not free to the people who have one, it is in fact paid for using the mobility component of the Disability Living Allowance which is given to them to provide help with extra costs associated with having a disability.

A car such as this enables people to lead more independent lives in many cases and also means they can transport the equipment they may need.

Nobody chooses to be disabled.

For those who are, the small things like a disabled space nearer to the entrance can make a huge difference to their day-to-day life and can make their day less of an uphill struggle.

JO LYONS

Bunting Close