Barking mad about the amount of dog mess

I AM writing to ask what the council is doing about the appalling dog fouling situation in town? I thought it had obtained a “poover” but I can see no evidence of it being used, at least not in my area.

Perhaps cutbacks in funding are to blame? I am still walking in the road at night to avoid stepping into something unwholesome on the pavements, which are often badly lit.

There are so many dogs around at the moment that I sometimes wonder if they outnumber people. I appreciate the fact that some people like dogs and they can be good companions, some may even be rescued animals, but surely they were meant to run around in wide open spaces and not be cooped up in tiny flats.

I know one man who has six of them and doesn’t even have a back garden. He’s also living in rented accommodation, and I wonder if the landlord is aware of it. I often have the cats v dogs argument with people. Cats are far cleaner than dogs and they don’t defecate in the street.

I passed an elderly couple in Bohemia Road the other day. They were looking down, had stopped in their tracks and then skirted around something. One said to the other: “It’s disgusting, you can’t walk anywhere in this town.”

When I turned around I noticed a large brown pile on the pavement, which, judging by the look of it had already been stepped in by another pedestrian.

One resident in my area has taken to putting up a notice-board berating the ‘filthy dog owners’ that don’t clean up after their animals and, according to the board, has even installed CCTV in an effort to catch the culprits.

It’s a pity that some people feel they have to go to such lengths to resolve a problem.

It seems to be mostly young people with Staffies who are doing it, though not entirely.

It’s at times like these that I wish dogs were banned from our towns altogether, like they are in some parts of the world.

In the meantime, I suppose we shall just have to put up with it and be careful where we tread.

STEPHEN J WATERS

Magdalen Road

St Leonards