The night the moon turned the colour of blood in the sky

BM 1 David Pulley SUS-150110-065952001

BM 1 David Pulley SUS-150110-065952001

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Keen sky watchers sent in a number of stunning pictures of what is being called the ‘Supermoon lunar eclipse’.

The event, on September 27, was also called the ‘Bloodmoon’ and saw the moon appearing to be 14 per cent larger with a reddish colour.

BM 2 Paul SUS-150110-073020001

BM 2 Paul SUS-150110-073020001

The phenomenon occurs when there is a full Moon, a lunar eclipse and when the earth shadows the moon. 
David Pulley took the picture, to the right, of the eclipse from below the south Terrace of the De La Warr Pavilion between 3 and 4:30am.
He said: “Monday’s lunar eclipse coincided with the full Moon at its closest to our planet making the Moon appear 14% larger and 30% brighter than norm. These larger full Moons occur every 413 days with the next scheduled for November 14th, 2016.
“Thirty years ago astrologer Richard Nolle coined the term Supermoon to describe these larger than normal apparitions. Do we notice this increase in size? Hardly. More noticeable is the optical illusion createdeach month when the full Moon hovers above the horizon fooling our brains into thinking that the Moon is very much bigger than it actually is. 
“Lunar eclipses occur twice a year but not all are total nor all visible from the UK. 
“The next total Lunar eclipse seen from Bexhill will be on 20th January 2019 and this will again be characterised by the beautiful red hue adorning the Moon’s surface. If you want observe the next Lunar Supermoon eclipse similar to last Monday’s you will have to wait until 2033.”
Other images here were sent in by Paul Deeming, Bev Marks and someone who just signed themseleves as ‘a lunatic’.
On November 18 there is Leonid meteor shower Some shooting stars are expected to be visible from November 15-20. Maximum rate of visible meteors from a dark location could reach 20 per hour.

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BM 3 Bev Marks SUS-150110-074332001

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