New Hastings seat once put out to sea as part of our fishing fleet

Boat Seat SUS-151111-110947001
Boat Seat SUS-151111-110947001
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A fishing boat which once plied its trade in the sea off Hastings has found a new use as a public seat and shelter.

The idea of transforming the disused boat came from Dee Day White and Tush Hamilton, who have been involved in a number of imaginative schemes which have helped transform, and add interest to, neglected corners of the Old Town.

The Priscilla MacBean being pulled to its final resting place at the bottom of Old London Road, Hastings. 15/11/14.'Deeday White and Tush Hamilton'''(THESE ARE VIDEO STILLS) SUS-141116-120348001

The Priscilla MacBean being pulled to its final resting place at the bottom of Old London Road, Hastings. 15/11/14.'Deeday White and Tush Hamilton'''(THESE ARE VIDEO STILLS) SUS-141116-120348001

The covered seat comprises of the hulk of the RX 273 boat, which used to fish off Hastings for 25 years.

It was built in 1984 by Sid and Herbie Phillips at Phillips Boatyard in Rye and fished the coast until being retired in 2009.

Now it has been positioned at the bottom of Old London Road, in the Bourne, next to the Priscilla MacBean lifeboat, which was also saved and restored by Dee Day and Tush.

Sid Saunders, who took the photograph here, commented: “This was a great bit of recycling and means that other people can now enjoy the boat and a sit down.”

Last month Hastings Mayor Bruce Dowling, who is Patron of The Priscilla MacBean Trust attended a screening of a DVD film, at East Hastings Angling Club which told the story of how the 96 year old lifeboat was found, by Dee Day White, rotting in a field near Eastbourne and restored to its former glory by local people.

Charlie Sharrod, former lifeboat cox and one of the restorers, said it was in danger of being turned into a coop by the farmer who owned it.

The Priscilla Macbean was built in Cowes, the Isle of Wight, and was a sister ship to the ill-fated Mary Stanford Rye Lifeboat, which capsized in November 1928, off Rye, with the loss of all 17 crew.

The restoration project was supported by Hastings Borough Council.

Tush Hamilton, a fishmonger who has lived in Hastings all his life, has become famous for his fish rolls, cooked up fresh in a large pan, which have helped promote the local catch and sustainability.

He has even featured alongside TV chef Jamie Oliver.

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