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19 black and white TV sets still in use

File photo dated 1940 of John Logie Baird, pioneer of television, It is 125 years since the inventor of television was born, on August 13 1888. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday August 12, 2013. John Logie Baird, from Helensburgh in Argyll and Bute on the west coast of Scotland, was the first person to publicly demonstrate television on January 26 1926. See PA story HISTORY Baird. Photo credit should read: PA Wire

File photo dated 1940 of John Logie Baird, pioneer of television, It is 125 years since the inventor of television was born, on August 13 1888. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday August 12, 2013. John Logie Baird, from Helensburgh in Argyll and Bute on the west coast of Scotland, was the first person to publicly demonstrate television on January 26 1926. See PA story HISTORY Baird. Photo credit should read: PA Wire

HIGH DEFINITION programmes and 3D TV may be all the rage but new research has found a host of families are still relying on their old black and white sets.

Figures released by TV Licensing shows that although the number of people using black and white televisions is dropping – there are fewer than 12,000 across the UK – some people are quite happy with their old fashioned apparatus.

There are currently 10 black and white television licences in force in St Leonards and nine in Hastings despite it being nearly 48 years since channels started transmitting in colour.

Hastings of course is hailed as the birthplace of television thanks to the early work of John Logie Baird. The inventor’s grandson, Iain Logie Baird, is now associate curator at the National Media Museum in Bradford and said he believed there are still nostalgic television viewers who are more than happy with their out-dated sets.

He said: “Despite more than 25 million people opting for a colour TV licence in the UK, it may be some time before the black and white television disappears completely from our living rooms.

“There will always be a small group of people who prefer monochrome images, collect vintage sets or just don’t want to throw away a working piece of technology.”

London currently has more than 2,000 black and white licences. The cost of a black and white TV licence remains frozen at £49 until the BBC Charter Review planned for 2016. A colour licence costs £145.50.

Emma Cowlard, spokeswoman for TV Licensing, said: “These figures show, even in the digital age, more than 11,000 homes still watch their favourite programmes on black and white televisions.

“We may be on the brink of losing black and white sets to the history books, but older technology will always be replaced by exciting new ways of watching live.” Do you have a black and white TV? Call our newsdesk on 856760 and tell us how old yours is.

 

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