Historic stained glass window gets make over

Leaded light maker and restorer David Till with the historic piece of glasswork at Churchfields Glass and Glazing Company
Leaded light maker and restorer David Till with the historic piece of glasswork at Churchfields Glass and Glazing Company
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A CENTURY-OLD stained glass window at Hastings Town Hall, which features the coat of arms of the man who gave away Queen Victoria at her wedding, has undergone a makeover.

The historic pane of glass was delicately removed from the hall last month and taken to Churchfields Glass and Glazing Company in Churchfields Industrial Estate.

The company has spent the last four weeks cleaning the glass and repairing the leading at its workshop in Armstrong Close.

It was believed to have last been taken out and cleaned 50 years ago.

The glass had become stained from bus exhaust fumes and some of the leading had become dislodged in high winds.

This week it will be gently lifted back into its rightful place overlooking the town centre 50 years after it was last removed and cleaned.

It is believed the window was erected during the building of the town hall in 1880, almost 40 years after the death of Prince Augustus Frederick the Duke of Sussex.

The Duke was born in January 1773 and was the sixth son of King George III and the German Princess Charlotte of Mecklenberg-Strelitz. He once lived at East Hill House in Tackleway in the Old Town.

The Duke was also the favourite uncle of Queen Victoria and gave her away at her wedding to Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha in 1840.

He died at Kensington Palace in May 1843. In his will he specified that he was not to have a state funeral and was accordingly buried at Kensal Green Cemetery in London.

Les Booth, glazing manager at Churchfields, said: “It has been a delicate operation as the glass is more than 130 years old.

“It had collected a lot of dirt from the old buses that used to go down the street outside.

“Part of it had been flapping about in the wind too which was causing a lot of concern.

“But we have painstakingly restored it to its former glory and it will shine on hopefully for many more years to come.”